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Captain Marvel

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Captain Marvel goes above and beyond the stereotype of feminism by just being Captain Marvel, directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, felt like a breath of fresh air. Starring Brie Larson in the lead role as Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel and Samuel L. Jackson as S.H.I.E.L.D agent Nick Fury, the story is one of self-discovery and poignantly tackles contentious female issues of the era in an elegant and refined manner.

Several films tout themselves as bastions of feminism, when in truth they are edifices of male-desires covered in a veneer of "feminist values." Captain Marvel goes above and beyond the stereotype of feminism by just being

Movies nowadays are saturated with sex, and obsessed with portraying a seemingly strong woman. However, those very "strong, independent and powerful women," are often forced to rely on a man for help eventually, like the character of Mira in the movie Aquaman. Additionally, movies with a woman lead almost always incorporate her love story, apparently a necessity to fully capture the female experience. Captain Marvel breaks the mold by not containing a single kiss or sex scene, and eschews a romantic subplot completely. Not once can Brie Larson be spotted in a "sexy pose," nor is she shown wearing high heels in any scene.

All her heroic stances have no element of sexuality; they are fueled purely by purpose and necessity. Unlike its recent contemporary, Wonder Woman (2017), Captain Marvel avoids having Carol Danvers rely on a man to save or help her. At face value, Wonder Woman may appear as a movie that emphasizes Diana's (Wonder Woman's) veracity, fortitude, and resilience, However, aside from a few throwaway lines blatantly placed as distractions or audience- appeasers, the film actually stands as a symbol of a male dominated market. In actuality Diana not portrayed as independent. Rather, she is spoon-fed throughout the film by Steve Trevor. Steve serves as a secondary protagonist to satisfy the male viewer and embodies a series of worrisome tropes. He "discovers" Themyscira, Diana's homeland, and introduces Diana to the world, symbolically and literally taking her virginity. He teaches her how to wear her own clothes, how to behave in an acceptable "human" manner, and what true love means. This fulfills the male fantasy of being the "special man" or teacher who can save the naive woman, the very woman who is strong and intimidating to every other male yet conveniently soft and pure for the "hero." Even in the end, Steve Trevor is the key to unleashing her Diana's true strength. She could not have done it without him, ultimately proving that, once again, the woman is reliant on the man to realize who she is. Contrastingly, Captain Marvel has Carol Danvers subvert the aforementioned banal plot structure with very little physical reliance on a male counterpart. Although she, similar to Diana, is a fish out of water - thrust into a completely unfamiliar environment - she does not rely on men to aid her during her assimilation into the world. She does it herself. She was truly her own woman, which is rarely portrayed in the modern era despite being the reality of many women.

Several films tout themselves as bastions of feminism, when in truth they are edifices of male-desires covered in a veneer of "feminist values." Captain Marvel goes above and beyond the stereotype of feminism by just being. It eliminates all the common tropes and problems usually involved with having a mainstream, female-lead movie. And Brie Larson does a fantastic job in her portrayal of Carol Danvers. She acts brilliantly and creates an alluring and beautiful character without once relying on her physical appearance.

I feel Captain Marvel is a potent, and honest example for daughters everywhere, for all ages. As the film reminds them, you are powerful and strong despite what society may tell you. You do not owe any them anything.

 

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